pikeys:

Conrad Jon Godly - Sol (2013)

(via onceuponawildflower)

(Source: voldermorte, via whovian-at-hogwarts)

(Source: tsumetaiyozora, via onceuponawildflower)

mandopony:

castielcampbell:

the-more-u-know:

amroyounes:

Whenever your faith in people is lost, remember these pictures.

This needs more notes. 37k is not enough

this is a post that deserves to be broken. One day I would like nothing more than too see this has too many notes.

People are still good. For some reason the negativity is all we pay attention to, but there are still good things happening in the world. We just need to be reminded of that once in a while.

(via peanutbuttarunna)

shereadsbooks:

I will always be grateful for how this was depicted in the film.

(Source: hernance, via imcoolestgirl)

onceuponawildflower:

heighten-your-creative-potential:

acompletelife:

Jessica Lorren

Her dress 😍

^ A perfect wedding dress.

onceuponawildflower:

heighten-your-creative-potential:

acompletelife:

Jessica Lorren

Her dress 😍

^ A perfect wedding dress.

jinoras-light:

I’m sure he’d be proud too

(via whovian-at-hogwarts)

whitetrashtiel:

the fact that they took the time to animate a gag reel is amazing

(Source: risaxrisa, via imcoolestgirl)

rhamphotheca:

Elephants Have 2000 Genes for Smell - Most Ever Found
We’ve long known that African elephants have a great sense of smell—but a new study shows that the large mammals have truly superior schnozzes.
by Christine Dell’Amore
Compared with 13 other mammal species studied, African elephants have the most genes related to smell: 2,000.
That’s the most ever discovered in an animal—more than twice the number of olfactory genes in domestic dogs and five times more than in humans, who have about 400, according to research published July 22 in the journal Genome Research. The previous record-holder was rats, which have about 1,200 genes dedicated to smell.
Why so many? “We don’t know the real reason,” study leader Yoshihito Niimura, a molecular evolutionist at the University of Tokyo, said by email. But it’s likely related to the importance of smell to the poorly sighted African elephant in interpreting and navigating its environment…
(read more: National Geographic)
photograph by João Nuno Gonçalves

rhamphotheca:

Elephants Have 2000 Genes for Smell - Most Ever Found

We’ve long known that African elephants have a great sense of smell—but a new study shows that the large mammals have truly superior schnozzes.

by Christine Dell’Amore

Compared with 13 other mammal species studied, African elephants have the most genes related to smell: 2,000.

That’s the most ever discovered in an animal—more than twice the number of olfactory genes in domestic dogs and five times more than in humans, who have about 400, according to research published July 22 in the journal Genome ResearchThe previous record-holder was rats, which have about 1,200 genes dedicated to smell.

Why so many? “We don’t know the real reason,” study leader Yoshihito Niimura, a molecular evolutionist at the University of Tokyo, said by email. But it’s likely related to the importance of smell to the poorly sighted African elephant in interpreting and navigating its environment…

(read more: National Geographic)

photograph by João Nuno Gonçalves

(via lupinaroundthemoon)